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Tuning in to wonder

So where/how do we find wonder?

The longer I live the more certain I am that we cannot find it.  I’m convinced that if we go shopping for wonder it will all but kill our chances of encountering it.  If we search for it we’ll find plenty of counterfeits, knock-offs, and pretenders --- malls, movie theaters, amusement parks, and the like are bloated with all manner of pseudo-wonder. Rarely, if ever, will you find the genuine article there.  And if you do, you’re more likely to find it in an incidental sort of way --- not through purchasing it but in an experience that was only peripherally associated with the place and occasion.  I’ve slowly learning that you don’t find wonder, it finds you. 

Having said that, I don’t want to leave the impression that there is nothing we can do but passively wait and hope for wonder.  The truth is, we can welcome wonder by preparing ourselves to recognize and receive it, for wonder is all around us.  It is in the air we breathe (and in the fact that we breathe at all --- have you ever thought about that?  There’s plenty of wonder there to appreciate and explore).  Wonder is in the people we rub shoulders with, it's in the work we’ve been given to do, in short, wherever life is you will find wonder.

Wonder isn’t a lot different than the radio waves that flood our airways.  It’s everywhere, but if you don’t have the ability to tune in to it, you’ll miss it completely.  Children seemed especially adept in regard to experiencing wonder, don’t they?  It seems to be their default setting.  But then one day they stop asking ridiculous questions, they no longer look at things from unique perspectives, they become self-aware, and it’s all over --- they're just like us. Now I have never been one who nostalgically laments the fact that children grow up (that is after all the plan), but is there some way they (and we), can remain child-like while growing out of being childish?

 
I think there is.  I think this is at least part of what Jesus was referring to when He spoke of having the humility of a child in order to enter the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 18:1ff).  Nothing is more repellent to wonder than a know-it-all attitude and as adults we can be so sure of everything. We know what we want. We know what we don't want. All that stands in our way is controlling everything to make sure things turn out according to our plans (good luck with that by the way). 
We ready ourselves for wonder by recognizing there are so many things of which we are unaware.  In addition to the mysteries of the universe, there is much that we don’t know relative to our spouse, friends, job, community, etc.  In fact, what we do know about life is miniscule (at best), when compared to all that we don’t know.  Whenever we raise our sail to catch the wind of exploration and embark on the adventure of discovery rather than fossilizing on the tiny island of what we know, we are preparing for wonder.

Wonder comes calling then as we learn to look at life with different eyes.  This ultimately begins when the veil is removed and we see Christ --- the epitome of wonder (1 Timothy 3:16).  If offering our bodies as a living sacrifice constitutes worship of God (and it does), then surely allowing Him to open our eyes to see qualifies as well.  We “contemplate the Lord’s glory,” (2 Corinthians 3:18), which if we look closely enough, is everywhere and touches everything (Ephesians 1:19-23).    

Worship and wonder have a symbiotic relationship.  Worship helps us to see wonder and wonder inspires further worship.  Churches must never trivialize their calling by trying to compete with the thrill-o-ramas.  They are called to promote worship and wonder by challenging people to look at life through spiritual lenses (2 Kings 6:8-17).
"I pray that the eyes of your heart may be enlightened in order that you may know the hope to which he has called you, the riches of his glorious inheritance in his holy people, and his incomparably great power for us who believe."  (Ephesians 1:18-19). 
That's wonder!
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